Tag Archives: 104th Regt of Foot

Regiment

Alexander Murchison
104th Regiment of Foot

Alexander Mercherson was a native of the parish of Kilmere on the Isle of Skye.  He was born about 1766.  When the New Brunswick Regiment of Fencible Infantry (later the 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot) was raised in 1803, one of the recruiting parties was sent to the Highlands of Scotland.  Mercherson (also spelled Murcherson and Murchison) was one of those recruited there.  He joined the regiment in October 1804, probably at Inverness, at the age of 38.  He may have been married at the time.  His wife was Barbara Macketche, a native of Inverness.  The Scottish recruits arrived in Fredericton on 20 September 1805 accompanied by seventeen women and forty-eight children.  Mercherson served as a private soldier for all of his career.

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William Brown Bradley
104th Regiment of Foot

William Brown Bradley and his twin brother Lewis Turner
Bradley  were born in Savannah, Georgia c1771. Their father, Richard Bradley, died c1780-81. During the Revolutionary War he was employed by the  Commissariat, a non-uniformed civilian body. Their mother was Sarah Turner, daughter of Lewis and Jeston Turner of Whitemarsh Island, Georgia.

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104th Regiment of Foot

John Allen
New Brunswick Fencibles

John Allen was born in Wilmot, Nova Scotia on 17 June 1784.  He was the only son of Lieutenant Colonel Isaac Allen who commanded the 2nd Battalion, New Jersey Volunteers during the American Revolution.  After the war, he moved his family first to Nova Scotia and then to New Brunswick where he received a grant of 2,000 acres of land at Kingsclear, just north of Fredericton.

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New Brunswick Fencibles

Mass GraveOld Fort Erie

Research compiled by the Heritage Arts Legacy of Fort Erie

Fighting was intense during August and September 1814 when the Americans applied pressure and laid .   During those two months, 150 men lost their lives in battle and were buried on the grounds of the fort in a mass grave.

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Richard Smith
104th Regiment of Foot

Richard Smith joined the New Brunswick Regiment of Fencible Infantry on 18 June 1805, which became New Brunswick’s 104th Regiment of Foot in 1810. When he joined he was under the minimum age of 15 to join as a Private, he did it anyway, instead of enlisting as a Boy (the category for people enlisting underage). Being a big lad he was assigned to the Grenadier Company (the biggest and strongest men of the regiment). Only men over 1.83 m (6′-0″) tall could be in this company and he was 1.88 m (6′-5″) tall.

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104th Regiment of Foot

John Winslow
41st Regiment of Foot

This application is sponsored by the Town of Woodstock, New Brunswick and the Carleton County Historical Society.

John Francis Wentworth Winslow was the son of a prominent Loyalist, Judge Edward Winslow.  He was named after John Wentworth, the Governor of Nova Scotia, and his wife, Frances, who was also the mistress of the Duke of Kent, Queen Victoria’s father.  As one of ten children of a large, but impoverished, prominent Loyalist family, Winslow sought a career in the British army, joining at the age of 16 on 14 December 1809.  Perhaps it was through family influence that he was commissioned as a Lieutenant, first in the Nova Scotia Fencibles, and he later transferred to the 41st Regiment of Foot that was stationed in the Canadas.

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41st Regiment of Foot

George Morehouse
New Brunswick Fencibles

This application is sponsored by the City of Fredericton, New Brunswick.

George Morehouse was the son of Daniel Morehouse of Queensbury, New Brunswick.  His father had been a sergeant-major and quartermaster of the Queens Rangers and received a Loyalist land grant following the American Revolution.  He later rose to the rank of major in the New Brunswick Militia and commanded the 2nd Battalion Carleton County Militia, headquartered at Woodstock, from 1810 to 1818.  Major Morehouse was instrumental in providing assistance to military activity along the upper Saint John River during the war.  Major Morehouse was charged with guiding men of the 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot to their post at Eel River in July 1812, and drilled the men of the 104th at that station in October of that year.  He was later mentioned in the spring of 1814 as having aided in the conveyance of seaman from the Maritimes to Canada, where they were to join the British squadron on Lake Ontario.  He also spent some time chasing a suspected American agent who was operating in the Woodstock area.

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New Brunswick Fencibles

John Jenkins
Glengarry Light Infantry

This application is sponsored by the City of Fredericton, New Brunswick.

A War of 1812 Hero Returns Home

By Robert Dallison, 20 March 2013

Captain John Jenkins returned to Fredericton a crippled war hero of great acclaim. From a respected Loyalist family, he was born in 1786 in New Brunswick. He was described “as a tall, fine looking young man,” one of six siblings, two of which were half brothers. He developed a close attachment to his Kingsclear family home and to the neighbors, the Winslows. Judge Edward Winslow noted in a letter that Jenkins was “as usual” a constant visitor. Although Edward Winslow Junior was a close personal friend, young Penelope Winslow held a particular attraction.

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Andrew William Playfair
104th Regiment of Foot

Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew William Playfair (1790-1868) of the 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot Epic Winter Military March during the War of 1812-1814

Lieutenant-Colonel Andrew William Playfair, born in 1790 in Paris, France, son of William the eminent author and inventor, was a distinguished soldier, writer, and Empire-builder.1 His father, William Playfair, invented three fundamental forms of the statistical graph the time-series line graph, the bar chart and the pie chart2 and a prolific author of political economy writing in both English and French.

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104th Regiment of Foot

James MacLauchlan
104th Regiment of Foot

This application is sponsored by the City of Fredericton, New Brunswick

James A. MacLauchlan was a leading figure in the early history of the Upper St. John River.  As both a government official and a militia officer, he helped to shape the outcome of the boundary dispute between Great Britain and the United States.  To quote W. Austin Squires,

“He was one of the best known men in the upper valley.”

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104th Regiment of Foot